just what I need, another toy

From: Ed King 
------------------------------------------------------
I loves me some banana

http://linuxgizmos.com/sbc-mimics-raspberry-pi-has-faster-cpu-adds-sata/

http://www.bananapi.org/#

Micro Computers / Displays - No fooling!

From: Chad Smith 
------------------------------------------------------
I found a couple of projects on Kickstarter that might interest some people
on here.

See what your Arduino is thinking

https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/1516846343/microview-chip-sized-arduino-with-built-in-oled-di?ref=popular

The MicroView is the first chip-sized Arduino compatible that lets you see
what your Arduino is thinking using a built-in OLED display.

A Touchscreen for your Raspberry Pi

https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/2135028730/piscreen-a-35-tft-with-touchscreen-for-the-raspber?ref=popular

PiScreen: A 3.5" TFT with touchscreen for the Raspberry Pi - All the
hardware needed to add a 3.5" TFT (480x320) with touchscreen control to
your Raspberry Pi, never need a monitor again!

And a bonus - wearable computing

https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/guardyen/metawear-production-ready-wearables-in-30-minutes?ref=popular

MetaWear: Production Ready Wearables in 30 Minutes or Less!

A tiny ARM+Bluetooth LE Platform for developing Wearable products (and
more) that are certified and ready to ship to customers.

I haven't backed any of these yet, but I am seriously considering the first
one.

*- Chad W. Smith*

Code with Your Kids (from the United Kingdom)

From: Phil Shapiro 
------------------------------------------------------


This looks promising, from the same land that gave us Isaac Newton and the Raspberry Pi. 
https://twitter.com/codewithkids 
phil -- 

Phil Shapiro, pshapiro@his.com 
http://www.his.com/pshapiro/briefbio.html 
http://www.twitter.com/philshapiro 
http://www.his.com/pshapiro/stories.menu.html 

"Wisdom begins with wonder." - Socrates 
"Learning happens thru gentleness." 

Raspberried.. W. Africa Linux.

From: Mike Harrison 
------------------------------------------------------

I bought two Raspberry Pi (B) ultimate kits this week..
Was impressed. now I gotta buy a third for myself just for fun.

One of them is going back to Benin W. Africa with Idriss,
whom, since I intro'd him to Linux almost two years ago
has become quite the Linux driven asset where he works.

His first Pi project is to use it to control some farm equipment 
(irrigation valves is the first step) for a family farm.

We often forget how technology can be used to address fundemental needs 
and how empowering flexible low cost open systems can be.

--Mike--




Mesh wireless with RaspberryPi?

From: Bret McHone 
------------------------------------------------------
Has anyone tried anything like this? I'm curious how it works.

http://www.ericerfanian.com/mobile-mesh-networks-with-the-raspberry-pi-part-1/

Thanks,
Bret

Dr. D., DC423 and QuadCoptor

From: Mike Harrison 
------------------------------------------------------


Went to the DC423.org meeting last night, saw an interesting presentation 
by  Stephen Hilt about a "leach" embedded controller he had built..
learned about "dronecell" a neat little GSM/GPRS module..added to a 
Raspberry Pi made an interesting useful remote device. Very small.

And Dr. D. kept playing with a nice little micro quadcopter... which I 
want to know which make/model that was because I need a cat tormenting 
toy...


Intel announces Edison at CES

From: Phil Shapiro 
------------------------------------------------------


From Ars Technica - a Linux computer the size of an SD card=20


" The executive also touted Intel=E2=80=99s new Edison chip, which appears =
to be a more sophisticated answer to the Raspberry Pi=E2=80=94it=E2=80=99s =
a 22nm dual core chip with built-in WiFi, Bluetooth, and ultra low power in=
 the size of an SD card. Edison, Krzanich said, will be available in mid-20=
14. The idea, so far, seems to be to integrate this chip into various small=
 devices, such as a smart baby blanket, bottle warmer, and other similar de=
vices. Intel did not yet release much in the way of technical specification=
s, price, or availability.=20


In addition to showing off this next wave of tech, Intel announced a contes=
t to encourage others to create similar (and hopefully better) devices. Say=
ing the company "didn't want to limit Edison to what we could think of," Kr=
zanich invited people from across the globe to participate in Intel's Make =
It Wearable contest. The basics are that the company will put forth $1.3 mi=
llion in prizes for potential Edison implementations, and the Top 10 conten=
ders will get connected with industry professionals to bring the winning pr=
oduct ideas to market. Intel has not yet revealed official contest details =
such as deadlines and rules."=20






--=20

Phil Shapiro, pshapiro@his.com=20
http://www.his.com/pshapiro/briefbio.html=20
http://www.twitter.com/philshapiro=20
http://www.his.com/pshapiro/stories.menu.html=20

"Wisdom begins with wonder." - Socrates=20
"Learning happens thru gentleness."=20

Packt computer programming ebooks for $5 (Christmas special)

From: Phil Shapiro 
------------------------------------------------------

This is a lovely holiday surprise for geeks. 


Scratch 1.4 Beginner's Guidebook - $5 ebook offer. http://www.packtpub.com/scratch-14-beginners-guide/book Reviewed at http://www.pcworld.com/article/181149/Book

Raspberry Pi on track to sell more units than Apple II computers

From: Phil Shapiro 
------------------------------------------------------

The Raspberry Pi has sold almost 2 million units. It looks like it's on track to sell more units than the venerable Apple II. When I was an Apple II software developer in the early 1990's, I recall Apple advertising that 6 million Apple II's had been sold. 


If anyone in the LUG is so inclined, it would be interesting to create side by side comparison charts on the approximate sales growth curve for these two computers. It took Apple 16 years to sell 6 million Apple II's. Raspberry Pi Foundation might achieve that goal in 4 years (or less). 


Linux is unstoppable. #unstoppable 


phil 

-- 

Phil Shapiro, pshapiro@his.com 
http://www.his.com/pshapiro/briefbio.html 
http://www.twitter.com/philshapiro 
http://www.his.com/pshapiro/stories.menu.html 

"Wisdom begins with wonder." - Socrates 
"Learning happens thru gentleness." 


Road Server Project

From: Mike Harrison 
------------------------------------------------------

Nancy and I bought a new RV yesterday, the next project will be turning
a netbook/notebook into an access device and server.

My goal is that it'd provide a consistent Wifi interface and network 
inside of the RV for a tablet/phone and a couple of laptops.
I've been collecting gear including a high range wifi antenna (a 
directional and an omni) - the goal is to merge a combination of WiFi
that I can suck (legally and with permission) and one (or more)
cell uplinks.

I've done some googling, and found some commercial "all in one" boxes for 
this, but me, being me, would love to roll my own on Linux.

My questions for the group:

   Am I insane? (probably)

   Is this a Raspberry Pi-ish project (That might be fun)

   Anyone seen any magic for managing multiple changing upstream 
connections or am I having fun with iptables and routeing commands via 
some perl scripts (which I know how to do..)?  It's been a while since I 
did these types of things.

--Mike--


============================================================
Mike Harrison   bogon@geeklabs.com  cell: 423.605.6943

Long range wireless communications with the Raspberry Pi

From: Phil Shapiro 
------------------------------------------------------
Long range wireless communications with the Raspberry Pi http://rpi900.com/ 




-- 

Phil Shapiro, pshapiro@his.com 
http://www.his.com/pshapiro/briefbio.html 
http://www.twitter.com/philshapiro 
http://www.his.com/pshapiro/stories.menu.html 

"Wisdom begins with wonder." - Socrates 
"Learning happens thru gentleness." 

Teach Python programming via Minecraft - Creative Commons book

From: Phil Shapiro 
------------------------------------------------------

This looks very interesting -- a Creative Commons book. 

Learning Python using Codecademy and Raspberry Pi Minecraft: a resource of great note 

http://www.raspberrypi.org/archives/4595 


Perhaps something suitable for the 4th Floor or Chatt*Lab or schools. Does anyone 
remember schools? 


phil 





-- 

Phil Shapiro, pshapiro@his.com 
http://www.his.com/pshapiro/briefbio.html 
http://www.twitter.com/philshapiro 
http://www.his.com/pshapiro/stories.menu.html 

"Wisdom begins with wonder." - Socrates 
"Learning happens thru gentleness." 


Pi or 'Duino?

From: Eric Wolf 
------------------------------------------------------
I'm wanting to build an automated dog treat dispenser but I want it to
trigger off various external events. I'm trying to decide whether to use a
Raspberry Pi or an Arduino for the controller. The advantage of the Pi is
easy of programming (Python FTW). The disadvantage is largely cost. The Pi
itself is a little more expensive, especially by the time you add in the
I/Os.

Any thoughts?

-=--=---=----=----=---=--=-=--=---=----=---=--=-=-
Eric B. Wolf                           720-334-7734

verdict

From: Ed King 
------------------------------------------------------
have really enjoyed playing with my, ummm, raspberry pi this weekend. 


however, now that I've layed hands on one, I realize that the pi can only supplement, not replace, the roku as a media center thingy

that said, I plan on buying another pi soon, so I won't have to disturb the one connected to the tv :)

late bloomer

From: Ed King 
------------------------------------------------------

This month marks my 6 year annivesary at current employer (yawn) so to "celebrate" I bought myself a new toy...   a Raspberry Pi.    Yeah, so I'm a year behind "the buzz"  

But unlike the early adopters who had to wait...  and wait...  and wait, mine is on schedule to arrive just one day after I placed the order (me loves me some Amazon Prime)

So my first 'project' will be a boring ol' xbmc to replace my ailing Roku.
  
Future project I have in mind is....    this is so embarassing...  a beat activated light show for my home disco.  ;)



Anyone have experience with tn5250 or xt5250 -- need it full screen or scaled

From: Lynn Dixon 
------------------------------------------------------
i am trying to use Raspberry Pi's as a TN5250 thin client.
I am currently using TN5250 and xt5250 but it will only do a small window.

I have tried editing the .tn5250rc file in my users /home but it still will
not scale.

Also, usually hodling left ctrl and right clicking would allow me to move
to a bigger font, but for some reason it is not working.

Anyone  have any experience to lend on tn5250 emulation and scaling the
window full screen?

Linux volunteer opportunity

From: Luke Prince 
------------------------------------------------------
I love the idea of a Raspberry Pi kiosk and would happily volunteer some
time to help set it up on that platform. I have always wanted to play with
one, and this could be the perfect opportunity!

On Wed, Apr 3, 2013 at 10:01 AM,  wrote:

> Send Chugalug mailing list submissions to
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> When replying, please edit your Subject line so it is more specific
> than "Re: Contents of Chugalug digest..."
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>
> Today's Topics:
>
>    1. Re: Linux volunteer opportunity (Kiosk station) (Mike Robinson)
>    2. Re: Linux volunteer opportunity (Kiosk station) (Darren Breidigan)
>    3. Re: Intro to Python class at the library (Dan Eveland)
>
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Message: 1
> Date: Wed, 3 Apr 2013 07:05:55 -0500
> From: Mike Robinson 
> To: chugalug@chugalug.org
> Subject: Re: [Chugalug] Linux volunteer opportunity (Kiosk station)
> Message-ID: 
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"
>
> The usual way to run a kiosk-station is to configure a user-name (often
> password-free, often always-logged-on by default) which runs the kiosk
> application directly as its "shell."  Thus, when that user logs-on, the
> kiosk is running; when the kiosk program ends for any reason, the user is
> now by definition logged-off.  Or, if you want a GUI, select a
> window-manager such as Matchbox which is designed for this purpose.
>
>
> http://serverfault.com/questions/59329/im-looking-for-secure-linux-kiosk-software
>
> http://users.telenet.be/mydotcom/howto/linuxkiosk/intro.htm
>
> http://www.engineering.uwaterloo.ca/twiki/bin/view/Linux/LinuxKiosk
>
> http://www.flatcoder.co.uk/how-to-build-a-secure-kiosk-operating-system/
>
>
> ---------
> Mike Robinson
> Technical Director
> Sundial Services International, LLC
> http://www.sundialservices.com
> miker@sundialservices.com
> (615) 268-3829
> http://www.linkedin.com/pub/mike-robinson/51/532/5a
>
> >
> > I'm not a guru but, I think some kind of kiosk would not be out of my
> reach.
> >
> > Maybe Lubuntu with Firefox in kiosk mode?
> >
> > https://addons.mozilla.org/en-us/firefox/addon/r-kiosk/
> >
> >
> > On 04/01/2013 11:58 AM, Nate Hill wrote:
> >> Hi all,
> >>
> >> As part of our 3D printing service we are offering at the library,
> >> with thanks to some help from James and Bill of Engage 3D, we now have
> >> 4 formerly retired and discarded computers running Ubuntu.  The plan
> >> is to have those running as Tinkercad stations, but Tinkercad is going
> >> away (lame) so we'll use something else.  Obviously we can do a lot
> >> more than just this with these machines.
> >>
> >> I know there are some Linux based kiosk systems out there; setups that
> >> allow people to schedule reservations of computers.  We don't yet have
> >> the demand that we need something like this, but I'm hoping as we
> >> expand hours and services on The 4th Floor this will really grow into
> >> a public computer lab running all open source goodies.
> >>
> >> I've got a machine that could be tasked as the 'computer signup
> >> station'.  Does anyone on this list want to give this project a shot?
> >> We'd love to have you.
> >>
> >> Nate
> >>
> >> --
> >> Nate Hill
> >> nathanielhill@gmail.com 
> >> http://4thfloor.chattlibrary.org/
> >> http://www.natehill.net
> >>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
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> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 2
> Date: Wed, 03 Apr 2013 09:47:23 -0400
> From: Darren Breidigan 
> To: chugalug@chugalug.org
> Subject: Re: [Chugalug] Linux volunteer opportunity (Kiosk station)
> Message-ID: 
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1; format=flowed
>
> Thanks for the links.
>
> Some suggest running the whole thing off a flash drive.
>
> It could probably all be done on a Raspberry Pi.
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 3
> Date: Wed, 3 Apr 2013 10:01:21 -0400
> From: Dan Eveland 
> To: Chattanooga Unix Gnu Android Linux Users Group
>         
> Subject: Re: [Chugalug] Intro to Python class at the library
> Message-ID:
>          L2n5KYwgSOQ@mail.gmail.com>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="utf-8"
>
> I am Nate's web guy. I have now made it much more obvious when registering
> to show if you are on the wait-list. It was way too subtle with small text.
> Basically anyone who registered after 7:30PM on April 1st is on the wait
> list. I see Michael Scholten in the class and Lynn Dixson on the wait list.
> Feel free to email me directly if you would like me to check.
>
>
> On Wed, Apr 3, 2013 at 6:32 AM, Michael Scholten  >wrote:
>
> > Thanks Nate
> > On Apr 2, 2013 7:47 PM, "Nate Hill"  wrote:
> >
> >> Hey
> >> I will follow up with my web guy and see what's up with registered folk
> >> vs wait list folk
> >> Thanks
> >>
> >> On Tuesday, April 2, 2013, Lynn Dixon wrote:
> >>
> >>> Michael
> >>> I didn't get any response other than the confirmation on the webpage.
> >>> Hopefully we were able to get in the class!
> >>> On Apr 2, 2013 7:22 PM, "Michael Scholten" 
> wrote:
> >>>
> >>>> (in late response to you Lynn...) I signed up. Pretty certain I am in
> >>>> the first 25 as there were still 2 slots open after I put my name in
> >>>> although I can't be sure. Should we/I have gotten any sort of
> confirmation
> >>>> Nate? Email or otherwise?
> >>>>
> >>>> -Michael
> >>>>
> >>>>
> >>>> On Tue, Apr 2, 2013 at 3:18 PM, rdflowers  wrote:
> >>>>
> >>>>> Simple interactions with a database, examples of actual code that are
> >>>>> fairly simple, BUT are beyond the "Hello, World" stage,
> python.orgmailing lists, getting new modules from
> >>>>> python.org or elsewhere, hashes, sets, multisets, tips and tricks;
> >>>>> or, some non-crowded subset of all that.
> >>>>>
> >>>>> ----- Message from stephen@averagesecurityguy.**info ---------
> >>>>>     Date: Tue, 2 Apr 2013 14:16:25 -0400
> >>>>>     From: Stephen Haywood 
> >>>>>
> >>>>> Reply-To: Chattanooga Unix Gnu Android Linux Users Group  >>>>> chugalug@chugalug.org>
> >>>>>  Subject: Re: [Chugalug] Intro to Python class at the library
> >>>>>       To: Chattanooga Unix Gnu Android Linux Users Group  >>>>> chugalug@chugalug.org>
> >>>>>
> >>>>>
> >>>>>  What specific things would you expect a 102 course to cover?
> >>>>>>
> >>>>>> Stephen Haywood
> >>>>>> Owner, ASG Consulting
> >>>>>> CISSP, GSEC, OSCP
> >>>>>> T: @averagesecguy
> >>>>>> W: averagesecurityguy.info
> >>>>>>
> >>>>>>
> >>>>>
> >>>>> ----- End message from stephen@averagesecurityguy.**info -----
> >>>>>
> >>>>>
> >>>>>
> >>>>>
> >>>>> --
> >>>>> R. D. Flowers, Chattanooga, TN, USA
> >>>>> http://chalice.us/poe/
> >>>>>
> >>>>>
> >>>>> 

Raspberry Pi Phillings

From: Phil Shapiro 
------------------------------------------------------
Hi chugalug community, 


I'm embarking on a project called Raspberry Pi Phillings to create a useful bootable Raspberry Pi memory card that I'll be selling for $20 within the next month or so. Some of the proceeds will go to families facing financial distress in Takoma Park, Maryland, the city where I work. 


I cannot stomach seeing more evictions. I don't have money to give these families, but I have the entrepreneurial tools, energy and skills to raise funds to relieve some of their financial stress. 

I could use some help from anyone who likes to make explanatory screencasts, writers, actors, musicians, cartoonists, videographers and Python programmers. Kindly contact me off-list if you're interested in having some involvement. No specific commitment of time is needed. 

phil 


-- 

Phil Shapiro, pshapiro@his.com 
http://www.his.com/pshapiro/briefbio.html 
http://www.twitter.com/philshapiro 
http://www.his.com/pshapiro/stories.menu.html 

"Wisdom begins with wonder." - Socrates 
"Learning happens thru gentleness." 

Raspberry Pi images

From: Stephen Haywood 
------------------------------------------------------
Do you have to use a pre-packaged image on the raspberry pi? If so, why. If
not, how do you build your own image? Also, will the RPi boot from USB
instead of SD card?

-- 
Stephen Haywood
Information Security Consultant
CISSP, GSEC, OSCP
T: @averagesecguy
W: averagesecurityguy.info

Easy linux images for CompactFlash and x86/Via Epia embedded devices?

From: Dan Lyke 
------------------------------------------------------
We're doing a massive rework of our house wiring. I tore out the
doorbell transformer, ran the numbers, and realized that the
transformer draws about 3 watts(!). All the time.

Hell, thought I, for that power I could run a Linux server doing
nothing but watching the doorbell. And if I ran a Linux server, I
could have it tunnel through the shop firewall and alert me back in the
workshop when the doorbell rang! And maybe hang more cheap webcams off
the computer, so I can show who's at the front door. And have a better
sounding doorbell than the gawdawful synthesizers they're using these
days. Heck, I could get a couple of lengths of cast iron sewer pipe,
and hook up a couple of solenoids, and have an actual freakin door
bell. And then I could have some mechanism for sending messages to the
shop when people are watching it.[0]

So I looked on my shelf and I could buy a couple of Raspberry Pi
boards, or even rework a couple of Atmel dev kits, but I have 2 500 MHz
Via Epia devices sitting there on the shelf. They probably draw an
extra watt or two, but they're x86, have serial ports and NTSC out
and a parallel port for digital I/O, and...

I could compile this from scratch. I've done it before[1]. But I'm sure
there are images.

I've found the iMedia embedded Linux install, but before I boot back
into Windows to follow their instructions for putting an ISO on
CompactFlash, I wanted to know if anyone else has a recommendation for
any other quick easy way to get a web server, some Perl, Python, or
even just C, everything running as root, on to a CF card.

Anyone?

Dan

[0] http://shopcam.flutterby.net/
[1] http://www.flutterby.com/archives/wiki.cgi?wikiid=726