U.S. can conduct offsite searches of computers seized at borders, court rules

From: Rod-Lists 
------------------------------------------------------


Get those home back up and deploy servers ready! 

Might be a bizness opportunity here. 


http://www.computerworld.com/s/article/9215554/U.S.

=============================================================== From: John Aldrich ------------------------------------------------------ Quoting Rod-Lists : [snip] Nope, but I"d be willing to bet Customs would have some serious questions about why you're taking a bare-metal laptop. Better idea would be to install a fresh generic version of your O/S and apps and not put any personal data on there, then just work remotely from your laptop. :-) Let 'em try and get your data THAT way! :-)

=============================================================== From: Stephen Rees ------------------------------------------------------ Basically, Border Doctrine trumps the 4th. Yeah, scary. You could also have /home be on a thumb drive that you keep separately or ship to destination. I also see a future in encryption/destruction systems where basically you encrypt your system. Customs says, "Enter your password for a search." You enter a certain password, the system instead scrambles the encryption keys and begins a silent wipe. Basically, it's yet another law that inconveniences the good guys and only catches the stupid crooks. The guys we have to worry about won't be stopped.

=============================================================== From: Rod-Lists ------------------------------------------------------ Given that border patrol conducts warrentless searches within 100 miles of the border 2/3rds of the US population are in a Non- 4th ammendment zone. http://www.aclu.org/national-security

=============================================================== From: Sean Brewer ------------------------------------------------------ Nah. No need for a blank system: http://www.truecrypt.org/docs/?s=plausible-deniability

=============================================================== From: Dave Brockman ------------------------------------------------------ -----BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE----- Hash: SHA1 Last time I checked, bare-metal laptops are allowed on airplanes. I don't have to explain anything. It's a laptop. It is what it is. Take it and I'll have another ordered before the plane lands. Critical data should never be *on* the laptop in the first place. Regards, dtb -----BEGIN PGP SIGNATURE----- Version: GnuPG v1.4.10 (MingW32) Comment: Using GnuPG with Mozilla - http://enigmail.mozdev.org/ iEYEARECAAYFAk2fX8IACgkQABP1RO+tr2Q67QCgvRYyuj0kOo/VM5d2xt9yUU44 AaIAnirQHYZnJaQKDoFAphet+OYZwoji =swd9 -----END PGP SIGNATURE-----

=============================================================== From: Dave Brockman ------------------------------------------------------ -----BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE----- Hash: SHA1 More amusing to just log in (with regular account w/o sudo access) at the console and hand it over. No, there is no Windows, no start menu, nothing but 80 columns of red on black background text. Enjoy. Regards , dtb -----BEGIN PGP SIGNATURE----- Version: GnuPG v1.4.10 (MingW32) Comment: Using GnuPG with Mozilla - http://enigmail.mozdev.org/ iEYEARECAAYFAk2fYEcACgkQABP1RO+tr2ShdQCgmXiMHOXU6xcY7+ChmK8LTcIL wjcAn1LuqzQGbrKCKO9vCEDYvbjaN1fg =lVAT -----END PGP SIGNATURE-----

=============================================================== From: Stephen Haywood ------------------------------------------------------ The ruling referenced in the original post says the government can send your laptop offsite for processing. You can do any fancy tricks you want with your laptop they can just confiscate it and process it elsewhere.

=============================================================== From: Sean Brewer ------------------------------------------------------ Haha. Yeah, they can take it off-site. It doesn't mean they'll actually get anything done, though: https://secure.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/wiki/TrueCrypt#Operation

=============================================================== From: Dave Brockman ------------------------------------------------------ -----BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE----- Hash: SHA1 And if it's nothing but a default load of debian with openssh-client installed, I'll at least get my tax dollars worth of wasted energy out of the entire episode. Bonus points if they spend extra "expert" hours verifying that it is indeed nothing more than a default load of a Linux distro w/o a GUI. Let's face it, if you are doing international travel and you deal with IP or other information that you would be in the least bit concerned that such data was taken away for processing in such a scenario, you are lining your head fully in front of the shotgun before pulling the trigger if such data is *on* that device. To coin a phrase that I dearly do hate, "to the cloud, to the cloud, to the cloud". All you should need is a device capable of SSH or VPN+RDP. Regards, dtb -----BEGIN PGP SIGNATURE----- Version: GnuPG v1.4.10 (MingW32) Comment: Using GnuPG with Mozilla - http://enigmail.mozdev.org/ iEYEARECAAYFAk2fbOsACgkQABP1RO+tr2STogCeMadZY1rYkK6tHPmp0m3v8/kg lfQAn3R3TJn7lO4xKXMYvt0fU5Jg2MJX =tC5d -----END PGP SIGNATURE-----

=============================================================== From: Christopher Rimondi ------------------------------------------------------ I use ROT26. Hiding in plain sight...

=============================================================== From: Rod-Lists ------------------------------------------------------ dummy install only. You think I'd put my data on a machine without pw login= ?=20 ----- Original Message -----=20 From: "Stephen Haywood" =20 To: "CHUGALUG" =20 Sent: Friday, April 8, 2011 3:56:13 PM GMT -05:00 US/Canada Eastern=20 Subject: Re: [Chugalug] U.S. can conduct offsite searches of computers seiz= ed at borders, court rules=20 The ruling referenced in the original post says the government can=20 send your laptop offsite for processing. You can do any fancy tricks=20 you want with your laptop they can just confiscate it and process it=20 elsewhere.=20 =20 u,=20

=============================================================== From: Rod-Lists ------------------------------------------------------ qFE E92E :D 2 D@ A=63:2?] ~C:8:?2= |6DD286 uC@>i Qr9C:DE@A96C #:>@?5:Q k49C:D]C:>@?5:o8>2:=]4@>m %@i Qrw&vp{&vQ k49F82=F8o49F82=F8]@C8m $6?Ei uC:52J[ pAC:= g[ a

=============================================================== From: Kenneth Ratliff ------------------------------------------------------ I'm sure they still can't force me to divulge my crypto password, so, whatever

=============================================================== From: Kenneth Ratliff ------------------------------------------------------ Who needs VPN? Tunnel your RDP connection over SSH. That's what I'm doing right now from work ;)

=============================================================== From: Rod-Lists ------------------------------------------------------ Seriously?! If the current legal framework allows them to demand your system password, what makes you think they can't get your encryption PW? In fact that is what happened in the case cited. ----- Original Message ----- From: "Kenneth Ratliff" To: "CHUGALUG" Sent: Friday, April 8, 2011 10:01:02 PM GMT -05:00 US/Canada Eastern Subject: Re: [Chugalug] U.S. can conduct offsite searches of computers seized at borders, court rules Get those home back up and deploy servers ready! Might be a bizness opportunity here. I'm sure they still can't force me to divulge my crypto password, so, whatever

=============================================================== From: Kenneth Ratliff ------------------------------------------------------ Really? I don't see anywhere in that article or the Stewart case where he made bones about having to give up his password. His entire issue was that his gear was unreasonably seized and taken offsite for forensic analysis. There was one idjut who DID deploy full disk encryption, but was nice enough to type in his password when ICE asked. When they found child porn, they arrested him. When they tried to bring the laptop back up later, they were met with it asking for a password, and he tried to refuse to provide it, citing the 5th. Which was a good move, but the judge ruled that by cooperating at the airport in providing his password, he'd waived his 5th amendment rights on that particular issue and had to give up his password. So that's why I'm saying - I would employ whole disk encryption, and absolutely refuse from the word go to provide any passwords. If they won't respect the 4th, they're going to force me to take the 5th. If they've got the forensic ability to crack the whole disk encryption, it means I should have used better encryption. I make it a habit to provide as little information as possible when dealing with legal authority figures - there is never ANYTHING you can say when dealing with the law that will make it better for you, except 'I want a lawyer'. Don't talk to the cops. Not even the border cops.

=============================================================== From: Mike Harrison ------------------------------------------------------ Rod. Why so worried? You dont travel much and dont have anything that interesting on a laptop anyway. Do you? I travel and carry a lot of important stuff, because bandwidth sucks where I am going. But /home is encrypted. Take my laptop? Want my passwords? I will comply after other systems have had keys changed, certificates changed.. That should be your response as well. Assume once that system has been taken or something plugged into it that it is no longer "yours". They make very "large" very "small" flash drives.... Back up important stuff on them and carry a clean system when you travel. Rebuild from scratch if you need to later. ----- Original message -----

=============================================================== From: Kenneth Ratliff ------------------------------------------------------ I wouldn't even tell them that. We still have the right to remain silent, but to paraphrase Ron White, most folks don't have the ability. If they're actually willing to arrest you, then you can explain that to your lawyer. If they just want to seize the gear and they'll get back to you later, that's fine, that's an annoyance, and if they find anything incriminating, that's your fault (either because you were misbehaving, or weren't smart enough to take the proper precautions about getting caught). Talking to the authorities in any adverse situation is just dumb, I don't want to give my opponent the ammunition he's going to shoot me with.

=============================================================== From: wes ------------------------------------------------------ Don't Talk to the Cops: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i8z7NC5sgik http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=08fZQWjDVKE -wes

=============================================================== From: Kenneth Ratliff ------------------------------------------------------ wrote: Yup, I've seen this presentation before, and it's highly accurate. It's = fairly popular in 2nd amendment circles :)

=============================================================== From: Mike Harrison ------------------------------------------------------ That is a purest stance. And you (and even I) may choose depending on the circumstances, to do exactly that: Nothing. It will make me miss my flight, possibly a scheduled paying engagement and affect a client relationship. It will probably cost me the use of a laptop for the trip, which in my case means I buy another one as soon as the plane lands. Which is not always easy or "cheap". In the real world, after a -LOT- of trips, the one time they wanted to evaluate my laptop, I gave the guy my business card and explained that they would have my full cooperation right after I called my boss so that he could notify our clients (as above) and that he would be making a complaint through the US Dept of Commerce and several foreign embassies. It was a complete bullshit bluff because I did not want to have to deal with the ape in front of me. I think he said: "Have a nice day".

=============================================================== From: William Wade ------------------------------------------------------ After all this I am surprised that I have not yet heard of a 2 password system. One password gives you access to the real encrypted data, and a second password gives you access to a different set of data that you can populate with non-sensitive stuff. Really would any boarder person know the difference?

=============================================================== From: Mike Harrison ------------------------------------------------------ 1. truecrypt does this. 2. You can have multiple accounts on a Linux system, with each users dirs individually encrypted.

=============================================================== From: Eric Wolf ------------------------------------------------------ I use truecrypt on all my machines that I keep personal information on. Even in Windows, it's really easy to setup and pretty much transparent. I'm sure on Linux it's even better. -Eric -=3D--=3D---=3D----=3D----=3D---=3D--=3D-=3D--=3D---=3D----=3D---=3D--=3D-= =3D- Eric B. Wolf =A0 =A0 =A0 =A0 =A0 =A0 =A0 =A0 =A0 =A0 =A0 =A0 =A0 720-334-77= 34

=============================================================== From: Ed King ------------------------------------------------------ you guys are just begging for a cavity search ;) ----- Original Message ---- From: Mike Harrison To: CHUGALUG Sent: Sat, April 9, 2011 7:49:06 AM Subject: Re: [Chugalug] U.S. can conduct offsite searches of computers seized at borders, court rules That is a purest stance. And you (and even I) may choose depending on the circumstances, to do exactly that: Nothing. It will make me miss my flight, possibly a scheduled paying engagement and affect a client relationship. It will probably cost me the use of a laptop for the trip, which in my case means I buy another one as soon as the plane lands. Which is not always easy or "cheap". In the real world, after a -LOT- of trips, the one time they wanted to evaluate my laptop, I gave the guy my business card and explained that they would have my full cooperation right after I called my boss so that he could notify our clients (as above) and that he would be making a complaint through the US Dept of Commerce and several foreign embassies. It was a complete bullshit bluff because I did not want to have to deal with the ape in front of me. I think he said: "Have a nice day".

=============================================================== From: Kenneth Ratliff ------------------------------------------------------ the circumstances, to do exactly that: Nothing. I'm not in the habit of compromising on my principles. You're right, of = course, in that most folks will simply give over. And that is why we = have a problem with the erosion of 4th amendment rights. Far too many = folks are willing to give in to avoid a hassle, and if folks aren't = willing to stand up and assert their rights, then I suppose they deserve = to lose them.=20

=============================================================== From: Eric Wolf ------------------------------------------------------ I don't know about you, but that's not where I keep my encryption keys.

=============================================================== From: Rod-Lists ------------------------------------------------------ principle of the matter. either constitution is worth the hemp is written on or not ----- Original Message ----- From: "Mike Harrison" To: "CHUGALUG" , "Rod-Lists" Sent: Friday, April 8, 2011 11:36:28 PM GMT -05:00 US/Canada Eastern Subject: Re: [Chugalug] U.S. can conduct offsite searches of computers seized at borders, court rules Rod. Why so worried? You dont travel much and dont have anything that interesting on a laptop anyway. Do you? I travel and carry a lot of important stuff, because bandwidth sucks where I am going. But /home is encrypted. Take my laptop? Want my passwords? I will comply after other systems have had keys changed, certificates changed.. That should be your response as well. Assume once that system has been taken or something plugged into it that it is no longer "yours". They make very "large" very "small" flash drives.... Back up important stuff on them and carry a clean system when you travel. Rebuild from scratch if you need to later. ----- Original message -----

=============================================================== From: Zach Gibbens ------------------------------------------------------ After a friends hassle with this, I'm more concerned about my phone than laptop, his hard drive fried in Alaska, so he pulled it out & left it there, took a trisquel live cd with him across the border to canada, was "asked" to search his laptop and phone, he notified them of the live disc and lack of HDD, they still checked, his laptop fine, but he has little clue about his phone, after enough time went by, he asked to be present, and they honored that request, kinda late in the process though. http://travismccrea.com/2011/01/31/us-government-owned-amtrak-hates-freedom= / For a few years now, I've used dmcrypt on mine with the exception of /boot which sits on a USB drive, before a trip I'd back up the drives, mail the laptop drive ahead, and rsync the boot partition, and just carry a live disc across, it's consistently worked. only once did I carry a cell phone across, this last trip, but it was a brand new Unlocked Moto. Razor, all the other trips I either went without, or just bought prepaids, but that's what I'd be more concerned about, carrying my smartphone and all it's data e I uff

=============================================================== From: Nick Smith ------------------------------------------------------ Is it really that much of a hassle to travel now? I havent been outside the US in years, but it seems a little drastic to mail your drive to where ever your going first. I thought they just scanned your machine for explosives or something? Why are they touching or looking at your data at all? Same with the phones, if they use their sniffing equipment to look for bombs and what not, and they just verify that it turns on without exploding, why would they go snooping through your data? Do they separate you from your devices to do this inspection? Like take it to another room and leave you waiting while they do it? The whole process just seems kinda shady. I dont see a reason to give them your passwords at all. Thats a security and im sure a constitutional violation of your rights. Its all part of that lets take away your rights so you'll be safer BS. om/ re I e t tuff f ?

=============================================================== From: Rod-Lists ------------------------------------------------------ The whole process just seems kinda shady.=20 You think? The Guv has been involved in a lot of IP enforcement l8ly.=20 Haven't you heard about homeland securirty seizing domains that the MPAA & = RIAA want shut down?=20 HOMELAND SECURITY!=20 Some are getting their laptops or phones confiscated for longterm=C2=A0 ana= lysis.=20 The U.S. Department of Homeland Security has concocted a remarkable new pol= icy: It reserves the right to seize for an indefinite period of time laptop= s taken across the border.=20 A pair of DHS policies from last month say that customs agents can routinel= y--as a matter of course--seize, make copies of, and "analyze the informati= on transported by any individual attempting to enter, re-enter, depart, pas= s through, or reside in the United States." (See policy No. 1 and No. 2 .)= =20 DHS claims the border search of electronic information is useful to detect = terrorists, drug smugglers, and people violating "copyright or trademark la= ws." (Readers: Are you sure your iPod and laptop have absolutely no illicit= ly downloaded songs? You might be guilty of a felony .)=20 Read more: http://news.cnet.com/8301-13578

=============================================================== From: Dave Brockman ------------------------------------------------------ -----BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE----- Hash: SHA1 Is 1984 in the PD yet? s/television/Internet\ Connected\ Device/g Maybe the masses could see the light if you shine it directly in their eyes.... Regards, dtb -----BEGIN PGP SIGNATURE----- Version: GnuPG v1.4.10 (MingW32) Comment: Using GnuPG with Mozilla - http://enigmail.mozdev.org/ iEYEARECAAYFAk2lprsACgkQABP1RO+tr2SqcQCdHpoU0W+/RMJdt55FezzjQ3no lvoAn0ForPqwpt04FtFPBg0YIPBU1/tl =Kw8e -----END PGP SIGNATURE-----

=============================================================== From: Dan Lyke ------------------------------------------------------ On Wed, 13 Apr 2011 08:26:00 -0400 Nick Smith wrote: It varies. I've waltzed through customs with a couple of questions, and I've had them completely root through everything I own. I haven't yet had an intrusive data search, but I'd imagine that since so much is up to the discretion of the border agent involved (the guy this last weekend coming home from Vancouver was downright rude and obnoxious, presumably trying to get a rise out of us, but searched nothing) that I think it largely depends on whether or not someone's having a bad day. Yeah, U.S. border control is worse for U.S. citizens than China's border control. Dan

=============================================================== From: Nick Smith ------------------------------------------------------ Its more harassing than anything it sounds like. They just need some common sense.

=============================================================== From: Aaron Welch ------------------------------------------------------ This brings up an interesting point, it is easier for a non-US national to e= nter through customs than it is for a US citizen to return home. Someone ex= plain that to me. -AW

=============================================================== From: Dave Brockman ------------------------------------------------------ -----BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE----- Hash: SHA1 Security Theater.

=============================================================== From: Mike Harrison ------------------------------------------------------ It's actually gotten better lately. Big hint, no matter what you are doing: look/dress like a bored professional travelling on business. They mess with me much less than those looking like a tourist, or me if I am looking like one. They expect I already know the rules if I am dressed and equipped like a pro. Reminder: I need slip-on dressier shoes to finish the "look". Foreign countries (that I visit) seem to mess with missionary types the most. I asked an immigration official once why the guy in front of me got the third degree. I loved his answer: "He sticks his nose in everybodies business and doesn't spend any money." You aren't officially in the country yet, you have fewer rights. The trick is not to have probable cause... on a sexual offender list? You have probable cause. Been to anyplace famous for sex-tourism and the security guard figures he'll have a chance to see titties on a screen while at work: Probable cause. Etc.. etc.. etc.. Post about this crap on Chugalug. Yeah, probably have probable cause. Che revolution t-shirt: probable cause..

=============================================================== From: Mike Harrison ------------------------------------------------------

=============================================================== From: Rod-Lists ------------------------------------------------------ Unfortunately being a passionate citizen online can get you marked and on a= nofly lists. more than few pacifists are on that thing just for talking about the school= of Americas online. Cue the Lee Greenwood. ----- Original Message -----=20 From: "Mike Harrison" cluon@geeklabs.com=20 =C2=A0Etc.. etc.. etc.. Post about this crap on Chugalug.=20 Yeah, probably have probable cause. Che revolution t-shirt: probable=20 cause..=20

=============================================================== From: Rod-Lists ------------------------------------------------------ Your are trying to banned from flying aren't you? ;) ----- Original Message ----- From: "Mike Harrison" To: "CHUGALUG" Sent: Wednesday, April 13, 2011 9:34:40 PM GMT -05:00 US/Canada Eastern Subject: Re: [Chugalug] U.S. can conduct offsite searches of computers seized at borders, court rules

=============================================================== From: Smitty ------------------------------------------------------ You know what else puts you on a list? Having a generic name like Paul Smith. I'm eternally screwed.. /c:

=============================================================== From: Nick Smith ------------------------------------------------------ But we can disappear into a crowd well, and not be found if we want to. ;-) n

=============================================================== From: Smitty ------------------------------------------------------ This is true. I have no quam's posting public on forums because every automatically assumes it's a fake name anyway. (c:

=============================================================== From: Stephen Kraus ------------------------------------------------------ Hey if they want to put me on a no fly list that's fine, just means I cannot be deployed This is true. I have no quam's posting public on forums because every automatically assumes it's a fake name anyway. (c:

=============================================================== From: Nick Smith ------------------------------------------------------ I dont think you will have that problem Stephen. On Thu, Apr 14, 2011 at 9:46 AM, Stephen Kraus wro= te: not

=============================================================== From: Dave Brockman ------------------------------------------------------ -----BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE----- Hash: SHA1 Disclaimer: I have done a minimal amount of flying in the past two years, and I have not yet met the porno scanner. FWAB sounds like the answer there to me. (Google, but not at work!) Attitude and actions are also very important. I used to slide through security toting 2-3 laptops, small switches, PIX firewalls, cables, all kinds of crap. The keys were 1) the shoes! 2) know the drill. Know how they want things placed (laptops by themselves in a crate, bag separate crate). Don't set off the metal detector, don't wear your 6" Belt Buckle. Talk to the DHS folks as they wand/watch you, but just small talk. Ask how their day is, do *NOT* make jokes. Worst thing I ever had happen was a lighter found in my laptop bag. (Before they decided we could carry them again). No cavity search, no hold-up, just took the lighter after finally figuring out what it was. And these things do vary by airport as well. Flying in and out of Chatt is nothing like flying in and out of ATL or LAX. (BTW, if you have connecting flights in LAX, make sure you have plenty of time if they are in different terminals, each terminal has it's own security checkpoint) Flying back from a vacation last year, my family was stopped because of a pizza cutter and "snow-globe" that somehow ended up in carry-on. However, since this airport caters to and the vacation spot supports at least 75% of their air traffic, guess what I came home with. I cannot stress this enough.... This is not Dudley Doowright of the Highway Patrol pulling you over. Be smart and polite, don't be a smart-a$$. I travel often with someone who *always* gets special attention due to rods in her knees. For the most part, I don't get the feeling the people doing the intense searches are all that happy about them either. There is always the exception, and those are the ones we will always hear about. But after a couple of trips, she knows the drill, tells them before she goes through where it's going to set off, walks through, steps aside and waits. What took 2.5 hours the first time now takes an extra 10 minutes at most. Regards, dtb -----BEGIN PGP SIGNATURE----- Version: GnuPG v1.4.10 (MingW32) Comment: Using GnuPG with Mozilla - http://enigmail.mozdev.org/ iEYEARECAAYFAk2nDCsACgkQABP1RO+tr2Q6xwCdGkX2kgWCDv6UK6R58ETlnbGU QXMAoJuzvGc7dc10h8qrJmoMn3bSRly9 =j3iJ -----END PGP SIGNATURE-----

=============================================================== From: Dave Brockman ------------------------------------------------------ -----BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE----- Hash: SHA1

=============================================================== From: Lisa Ridley ------------------------------------------------------ I believe he did. Sent from my iPad

=============================================================== From: Rod-Lists ------------------------------------------------------ ----- Original Message -----=20 From: "Dave Brockman" dave@brockmans.com=20 Disclaimer: I have done a minimal amount of flying in the past two=20 years, and I have not yet met the porno scanner. =C2=A0FWAB sounds like the= =20 answer there to me. =C2=A0(Google, but not at work!)=20 ----------------------- "and I have not yet met the porno scanner." Ask a rape/abuse survivor how they feel about the porno scanner/grope dilem= a. Ain't too happy about it myself. Yes I might fly up to New York this summer= . I wonder if having a pilot in your family can get around such crap. Wonders how small air fields fit in this. FWAB?=20 Federal Write-in Absentee Ballot. friends without a border, F'ing white boy= ? I'm stumped.

=============================================================== From: Dave Brockman ------------------------------------------------------ -----BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE----- Hash: SHA1 I can only imagine.... I can't imagine anyone really being happy about it... The pilot won't be walking through with you, so probably not. Fly With A B*ner. Regards, dtb -----BEGIN PGP SIGNATURE----- Version: GnuPG v1.4.10 (MingW32) Comment: Using GnuPG with Mozilla - http://enigmail.mozdev.org/ iEYEARECAAYFAk2nFbsACgkQABP1RO+tr2TK7gCfZDYIFzumX7fzu/OJkVGY3be7 CRQAn1FlY8tJiSotBo87Jvyxs0sZ0mGu =JStL -----END PGP SIGNATURE-----

=============================================================== From: Dan Lyke ------------------------------------------------------ On Thu, 14 Apr 2011 11:00:59 -0400 Dave Brockman wrote: Amusingly, at San Francisco they have it laid out so you can see well ahead of time which the pornoscan lines are, and choose another one. But there were so many violations of good security at SFO on this last trip that all I can do is roll my eyes and sigh. And in YVR on the way back I carefully separated out my laptop into its own bin, and the Canadian security guard stuffed it back with my other gear. In general, just keep smilin'. They don't know how to react to that. Dan

=============================================================== From: "kitepilot@kitepilot.com" ------------------------------------------------------ It depends on how you define "pilot" and "small air fields".=20 For an A380 driver, Chattanooga Airport is minuscule. For me, it is a great runway and excellent equipment. Compared to Jasper, that is. Never mind about Collegdale. Or Dallas Bay...=20 The reality of the situation, is that you have to go into relatively BIG=20 general aviation aircraft (well over 12000 pounds "gross weight") to even=20 approach the destructive power of a UHaul van, never mind a full size tru= ck.=20 As a "pilot", I most times get grief out of my second "profession". For those (fortunate ones ;-) that have seen me, you'll remember the mes= sy=20 bush on top of my head (what's left doesn't even qualify as hair) and my=20 "serene" face.=20 I hate checking bags, never mind my expensive aviation paraphernalia. You'd have to see the faces of this hmmmmm... People? when they pull out headsets, and laptops, and aviation charts, and get=20 answers with my "slight" Spanish accent, you can literally smell the fear= . I have been pulled over (OK, in the middle of nowhere in Arkansas) and as= ked=20 by the "officer" "why do I have those things on me". My answer was a cryptic: "is that illegal?" They don't even know... Sigh... ET=20 =20 Rod-Lists writes:=20 the=20 ilema. mmer. boy?

=============================================================== From: Dave Brockman ------------------------------------------------------ -----BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE----- Hash: SHA1 I find myself constantly dumbstruck at the irony that the supposedly most free nation on Earth is also the one with the most 'isms'. Hell, I think we invented half of them.... Regards, dtb -----BEGIN PGP SIGNATURE----- Version: GnuPG v1.4.10 (MingW32) Comment: Using GnuPG with Mozilla - http://enigmail.mozdev.org/ iEYEARECAAYFAk2nNC0ACgkQABP1RO+tr2QaTACgo2YJhjMqQU1/D0HQlCHT6+Kz Em4An15hN2TUIfY+k+j2Ac00vU+rNj0X =dw2W -----END PGP SIGNATURE-----

=============================================================== From: Mike Harrison ------------------------------------------------------ When I get back, I will set it up.

=============================================================== From: Rod-Lists ------------------------------------------------------ "CNN has obtained a list of roughly 70 'behavioral indicators' that TSA beh= avior detection officers use to identify potentially 'high risk' passengers= at the nation's airports, and report that arrogant complaining about airpo= rt security is one indicator TSA officers consider when looking for possibl= e criminals and terrorists. When combined with other behavioral indicators,= it could result in a traveler facing additional scrutiny. 'Expressing your= contempt about airport procedures =E2=80=94 that's a First Amendment-prote= cted right,' says Michael German, a former FBI agent who now works as legal= counsel for the American Civil Liberties Union. 'It's circular reasoning w= here, you know, I'm going to ask someone to surrender their rights; if they= refuse, that's evidence that I need to take their rights away from them. A= nd it's simply inappropriate.' Interestingly enough, some experts say terro= rists are much more likely to avoid confrontations with authorities, saying= an al-Qaeda training manual instructs members to blend in ."=20 http://tech.slashdot.org/story/11/04/15/2051220/TSA-Investigates-People-Who= -Complain-About-TSA

=============================================================== From: Zach Gibbens ------------------------------------------------------ I've only dealt with land crossings for international travel thus far, and it seems that the less tech you take, the quicker things are (I cannot pull off a business look as long as people question my age, last trip I was 20, people have commented that I look like I could be in High School still too, CBP & CBSA have not, but I get the feeling a few have thought just that) The way CBSA searches, it would have to be your desktop wallpaper, used the systems file browser, didn't check if a filesystem was unmounted (easy to do in Windows too, that kinda suprised me, however they weren't really aware of crunchbang, it just seems like something trivial to me, and they never check on windows or mac for that, according to some friends) Mailing the Drive seems a bit overboard to me, but I've never spent more than an hour crossing myself (leaving out anyone else on the bus or train going slow, being stopped) and I know that my drive is there before I am, my screwdrivers on my keychain, nothing was messed with, it's the way the US is, indefinite offsite search that bugs me, so far they've not even booted my laptop up, but if they did search it for a month or more, I know I've got access to everything I need, plus backups from before the trip. They haven't separated me from my laptop yet, good luck? but the phone was separate, according to my friend. Android ships with alot of room for storage and no file browser, I can't recall if CM7 includes a file browser. I have no clue what they're doing for phone searches exactly, they look at dumb phones too, perhaps a pen register All this change, I recall the ability to sail across the great lakes, no questions asked, notify CBSA you've arrived, plan to leave, have a nice stay (and that notification could be over radio or phone) ehavior detection officers use to identify potentially 'high risk' passenge= rs at the nation's airports, and report that arrogant complaining about air= port security is one indicator TSA officers consider when looking for possi= ble criminals and terrorists. When combined with other behavioral indicator= s, it could result in a traveler facing additional scrutiny. 'Expressing yo= ur contempt about airport procedures =E2=80=94 that's a First Amendment-pro= tected right,' says Michael German, a former FBI agent who now works as leg= al counsel for the American Civil Liberties Union. 'It's circular reasoning= where, you know, I'm going to ask someone to surrender their rights; if th= ey refuse, that's evidence that I need to take their rights away from them.= And it's simply inappropriate.' Interestingly enough, some experts say ter= rorists are much more likely to avoid confrontations with authorities, sayi= ng an al-Qaeda training manual instructs members to blend in ." ho-Complain-About-TSA

=============================================================== From: Dave Brockman ------------------------------------------------------ -----BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE----- Hash: SHA1 Not sure what they are doing on Smartphones, but when this crap started, I used to have to turn my pager and cell phone off and back on, just to make sure it was what it looked like I suppose. I just don't keep data on my laptop any more. I sync up to subversion and then delete my local repository, sync back what I need, or browse via https from remote. Regards, dtb -----BEGIN PGP SIGNATURE----- Version: GnuPG v1.4.10 (MingW32) Comment: Using GnuPG with Mozilla - http://enigmail.mozdev.org/ iEYEARECAAYFAk2uA5gACgkQABP1RO+tr2QlGwCgom2zt/Ub4Z7NHJT7sng4ElEe 5f8An25l8xZP+/h8CiRWstufOGh3isVP =hVJg -----END PGP SIGNATURE-----