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ZDNet - 25 things my new Android phone does that makes my iPhone feel old

From: Phil Shapiro 
------------------------------------------------------



A lovely explanation of the ways Android trounces the iPhone. 

http://tinyurl.com/mu4wpeh 




-- 

Phil Shapiro, pshapiro@his.com 
http://www.his.com/pshapiro/briefbio.html 
http://www.twitter.com/philshapiro 
http://www.his.com/pshapiro/stories.menu.html 

"Wisdom begins with wonder." - Socrates 
"Learning happens thru gentleness." 


=============================================================== From: Randy Yates ------------------------------------------------------ As someone who has had two iPhones and two Android devices, I'd like to address these. Disclaimer: I'm not a fanboy of either Android or iOS. I will come across this way because I find my iPhone more usable than my Android devices in many ways. I would move right over to Android if it weren't for these issues. 1. Replaceable battery - Yup you can replace the battery in most if not all android devices. From my experience, you have to. I had tons of battery issues with my HTC. It wouldn't stay charged very long and there was an issue with the phone where if the battery completely died it wouldn't charge at all unless I removed the battery, placed it in my wife's exact same phone, and charge it a bit there. My iPhone stays charged for days, with the same amount of usage. Just saying... 2. You can add memory cards. I agree that this is helpful, however, my HTC also had less onboard storage so it was required for me to add an SD card to get the same amount of storage as I have with my current iPhone. I like that I could have added more, but I seriously don't come close to using all my onboard storage on my iPhone. So, while this is a great feature, it doesn't really pertain to me. 3. You can replace the back cover. Yup you can replace it with any tacky back cover you want. I don't have any cover on my iPhone because it is pretty solid and doesn't scratch. I like the look of it right out of the box and don't need any custom covers for it. 4. It supports wireless inductive charging without a bulky sled. First I only have to charge my iPhone about once every two to three days. It holds a charge that well. With the same usage on my HTC, I charge sometimes twice a day. Secondly, I don't need wireless charging in general because USB charging is convenient enough for me. This would be a cool feature, but I'd never use it. So, again, for me personally, this isn't useful. I prefer to have a phone that just works, rather than features I'll never use. 5. Drag and drop files from/to the phone and desktop. I can do this with all the files that I want to transfer between my phone and desktop anyway, mainly images. For everything else, I use the google drive app which doesn't even require me to connect the usb. You can do this with android as well, but again this isn't a feature that I need because it's trumped by google drive. 6. Full HD 1080p display. That's a great feature, but it also carries with it something I didn't like about my HTC. It was too big. I felt like I was putting a tablet up next to my head when I talked on the phone. The iPhone is more comfortable when you use it as a phone. I like my phones to feel like phones, and I personally don't sit around watching movies on my phone. It's a good feature, but one that I wouldn't use. Again, I prefer a phone that works well. 7. No iTunes. Great feature. This is so far the only one I would like to have. 8. Replace the launcher. Yup I did this with my HTC, and the various ones I tried sucked. The iPhone interface is actually damn good. It groups apps well. You can move apps around where you want them. Most of all it's fast. I had a terrible time with even the default launcher on the HTC. Sometimes it was just slow. Sometimes it would hang up. I can't tell you how many times I had to completely reboot the phone because of hangups in Android. I can tell you how many times I've had to do it with the iPhone. Zero. 9. Your home screen can be alive. It sure can, and usually this helps to make your whole phone dead, at least from my experience. I find that some of these features actually make Android very unstable. Realistically, I don't care if the home screen is "alive" as long as it's working. 10. Replace the unlock screen. This is not a feature that will make me want to give up the stability of iOS. Sorry. 11. It's a tricoder. I would like to have more sensors. Specifically, I would like to have temperature and barometric readings. This is handy, but not something I need from my phone. I hate to harp on it, but I really like my phone to just work. 12. It supports NFC. Nifty. I would use that all the time.. No really, any feature that I won't use is just not a feature. It's a selling point, sure, but it doesn't help me. 13. IR Emitter. I'd like to have this. I have a universal remote but I can keep up with my phone a lot better. So this would actually be something I'd like to have. Second one on the list! 14. Stealthy TV-B-Gone. Doesn't this directly relate to number 13? 15. Senses hand gestures above it. I wonder how often this would cause a problem. Inadvertently causing something to happen that you don't want to happen. 16. It watches your eyes... Well I like the idea of it using the correct orientation. I'm not to happy about the front camera being turned on when I haven't explicitly told it to be on. I play a lot of Fling and other games while doing my business in the bathroom. 17. 16 mp camera. Hey I can always use more megapixels. I'm for this one. 18. Camera can remove objects that don't belong in the image. This is a cool feature. Is it automatic, because that object that doesn't belong in the image may be the object I want to capture. I'm not familiar enough with this feature to say whether I like it or not. 19. It can take multiple images and composite them together automatically. Surely there is an app for this. I never had a need to look though. 20. You can install apps from the browser on your PC. Great feature, if you need it. I always install from the phone. I have installed from the phone's browser. 21. Two apps on the screen at once. With the small amount of screen real estate on a phone I don't think I'd ever want to do this. Also, as unstable as I've always found Android to be, I'd bet this would break things fast. I'm only guessing though, based on a few years of experience using Android devices. 22. You can automate almost anything. I've gotten into a rut here with these features because most of them are things that I would never use, and I'm being completely honest. The IR capabilities and sensor data are the only hardware features on the list that I've liked so far. Some of the other features just seem to be not very useful. What do I need to automate? I have alarms to remind me of things. What can I automate? I'd love suggestions for this one because I can't think of anything that I would need. 23. Receipt within minutes not weeks. Amen. I would really like to see faster receipts from the Apple store. 24. Google voice integration. I have google voice but I don't use it that often. In fact, when I had this setup on my HTC I found it confusing at times because my voice mail may end up on Google Voice or it may be on my phone. This is mainly a problem with me, as I've not dug into the usefulness of Google Voice. Google Wave was neat, but it wasn't useful. Google Voice is a bit more useful but I still never touch it. 25. A new hobby (fiddling with your phone). I have enough of a hobby fiddling with my PCs. I know some people enjoy fiddling with their phones. However, I like using my phones as...well hell... a phone. I found that fiddling with my HTC caused it to run even worse than it ran with all the default settings. In conclusion, after years of trying both platforms, I really prefer the iPhone. I WANT to prefer Android because I really like the customization options. However, it has always been very unstable for me. The interface can become very slow and jerky. My iPhone is very stable and smooth. My iPhone also has great battery life. After using an HTC for 2 years, I went back to the iPhone (I had a 3GS previously). I was flat out amazed at the battery life of my 4S. Some of my issues with Android may have been the HTC phone that I had. My friend Lynn (also on this list) loves Android and would probably argue with me on every point, but he has also never owned an iPhone. I'm not an Apple lover, but for a phone, my iPhone is the most useful smart phone I've ever owned. I may change my mind some day in the future, but I highly doubt that it will come any time soon. If you made it through all this. Thanks for reading!

=============================================================== From: Phil Shapiro ------------------------------------------------------ Randy, thanks for that very detailed explanation. That helps all of us make the most informed decisions. As an open source supporter, I want to like Android. There are times when Android drives me nuts, though. (On my Motorola Droid, my contacts list used to get constantly scrambled up with names and phone numbers.) phil ----- Original Message ----- From: "Randy Yates" To: "Chattanooga Unix Gnu Android Linux Users Group" Sent: Friday, July 12, 2013 5:07:16 PM Subject: Re: [Chugalug] ZDNet - 25 things my new Android phone does that makes my iPhone feel old As someone who has had two iPhones and two Android devices, I'd like to address these. Disclaimer: I'm not a fanboy of either Android or iOS. I will come across this way because I find my iPhone more usable than my Android devices in many ways. I would move right over to Android if it weren't for these issues. 1. Replaceable battery - Yup you can replace the battery in most if not all android devices. From my experience, you have to. I had tons of battery issues with my HTC. It wouldn't stay charged very long and there was an issue with the phone where if the battery completely died it wouldn't charge at all unless I removed the battery, placed it in my wife's exact same phone, and charge it a bit there. My iPhone stays charged for days, with the same amount of usage. Just saying... 2. You can add memory cards. I agree that this is helpful, however, my HTC also had less onboard storage so it was required for me to add an SD card to get the same amount of storage as I have with my current iPhone. I like that I could have added more, but I seriously don't come close to using all my onboard storage on my iPhone. So, while this is a great feature, it doesn't really pertain to me. 3. You can replace the back cover. Yup you can replace it with any tacky back cover you want. I don't have any cover on my iPhone because it is pretty solid and doesn't scratch. I like the look of it right out of the box and don't need any custom covers for it. 4. It supports wireless inductive charging without a bulky sled. First I only have to charge my iPhone about once every two to three days. It holds a charge that well. With the same usage on my HTC, I charge sometimes twice a day. Secondly, I don't need wireless charging in general because USB charging is convenient enough for me. This would be a cool feature, but I'd never use it. So, again, for me personally, this isn't useful. I prefer to have a phone that just works, rather than features I'll never use. 5. Drag and drop files from/to the phone and desktop. I can do this with all the files that I want to transfer between my phone and desktop anyway, mainly images. For everything else, I use the google drive app which doesn't even require me to connect the usb. You can do this with android as well, but again this isn't a feature that I need because it's trumped by google drive. 6. Full HD 1080p display. That's a great feature, but it also carries with it something I didn't like about my HTC. It was too big. I felt like I was putting a tablet up next to my head when I talked on the phone. The iPhone is more comfortable when you use it as a phone. I like my phones to feel like phones, and I personally don't sit around watching movies on my phone. It's a good feature, but one that I wouldn't use. Again, I prefer a phone that works well. 7. No iTunes. Great feature. This is so far the only one I would like to have. 8. Replace the launcher. Yup I did this with my HTC, and the various ones I tried sucked. The iPhone interface is actually damn good. It groups apps well. You can move apps around where you want them. Most of all it's fast. I had a terrible time with even the default launcher on the HTC. Sometimes it was just slow. Sometimes it would hang up. I can't tell you how many times I had to completely reboot the phone because of hangups in Android. I can tell you how many times I've had to do it with the iPhone. Zero. 9. Your home screen can be alive. It sure can, and usually this helps to make your whole phone dead, at least from my experience. I find that some of these features actually make Android very unstable. Realistically, I don't care if the home screen is "alive" as long as it's working. 10. Replace the unlock screen. This is not a feature that will make me want to give up the stability of iOS. Sorry. 11. It's a tricoder. I would like to have more sensors. Specifically, I would like to have temperature and barometric readings. This is handy, but not something I need from my phone. I hate to harp on it, but I really like my phone to just work. 12. It supports NFC. Nifty. I would use that all the time.. No really, any feature that I won't use is just not a feature. It's a selling point, sure, but it doesn't help me. 13. IR Emitter. I'd like to have this. I have a universal remote but I can keep up with my phone a lot better. So this would actually be something I'd like to have. Second one on the list! 14. Stealthy TV-B-Gone. Doesn't this directly relate to number 13? 15. Senses hand gestures above it. I wonder how often this would cause a problem. Inadvertently causing something to happen that you don't want to happen. 16. It watches your eyes... Well I like the idea of it using the correct orientation. I'm not to happy about the front camera being turned on when I haven't explicitly told it to be on. I play a lot of Fling and other games while doing my business in the bathroom. 17. 16 mp camera. Hey I can always use more megapixels. I'm for this one. 18. Camera can remove objects that don't belong in the image. This is a cool feature. Is it automatic, because that object that doesn't belong in the image may be the object I want to capture. I'm not familiar enough with this feature to say whether I like it or not. 19. It can take multiple images and composite them together automatically. Surely there is an app for this. I never had a need to look though. 20. You can install apps from the browser on your PC. Great feature, if you need it. I always install from the phone. I have installed from the phone's browser. 21. Two apps on the screen at once. With the small amount of screen real estate on a phone I don't think I'd ever want to do this. Also, as unstable as I've always found Android to be, I'd bet this would break things fast. I'm only guessing though, based on a few years of experience using Android devices. 22. You can automate almost anything. I've gotten into a rut here with these features because most of them are things that I would never use, and I'm being completely honest. The IR capabilities and sensor data are the only hardware features on the list that I've liked so far. Some of the other features just seem to be not very useful. What do I need to automate? I have alarms to remind me of things. What can I automate? I'd love suggestions for this one because I can't think of anything that I would need. 23. Receipt within minutes not weeks. Amen. I would really like to see faster receipts from the Apple store. 24. Google voice integration. I have google voice but I don't use it that often. In fact, when I had this setup on my HTC I found it confusing at times because my voice mail may end up on Google Voice or it may be on my phone. This is mainly a problem with me, as I've not dug into the usefulness of Google Voice. Google Wave was neat, but it wasn't useful. Google Voice is a bit more useful but I still never touch it. 25. A new hobby (fiddling with your phone). I have enough of a hobby fiddling with my PCs. I know some people enjoy fiddling with their phones. However, I like using my phones as...well hell... a phone. I found that fiddling with my HTC caused it to run even worse than it ran with all the default settings. In conclusion, after years of trying both platforms, I really prefer the iPhone. I WANT to prefer Android because I really like the customization options. However, it has always been very unstable for me. The interface can become very slow and jerky. My iPhone is very stable and smooth. My iPhone also has great battery life. After using an HTC for 2 years, I went back to the iPhone (I had a 3GS previously). I was flat out amazed at the battery life of my 4S. Some of my issues with Android may have been the HTC phone that I had. My friend Lynn (also on this list) loves Android and would probably argue with me on every point, but he has also never owned an iPhone. I'm not an Apple lover, but for a phone, my iPhone is the most useful smart phone I've ever owned. I may change my mind some day in the future, but I highly doubt that it will come any time soon. If you made it through all this. Thanks for reading! A lovely explanation of the ways Android trounces the iPhone. http://tinyurl.com/mu4wpeh -- Phil Shapiro, pshapiro@his.com http://www.his.com/pshapiro/briefbio.html http://www.twitter.com/philshapiro http://www.his.com/pshapiro/stories.menu.html "Wisdom begins with wonder." - Socrates "Learning happens thru gentleness."

=============================================================== From: Carey A ------------------------------------------------------ I'm currently using a 3 year old EVO 4G with stock rom and the original battery. I do have some extended life batteries for it. I charge it once a day, and it is my PC replacement for the majority of the day. I have rooted it and made some changes to help out the battery life, but nothing major. I like the fact that I could change out the SD card. It originally came with an 8 GB SD card and now I have a 32 GB card. If you wanted to use an older iPhone and upgrade the storage.. well, you couldn't, you'd have to buy a newer model. The ability to upgrade the storage, just makes it more useful in the future. I use Google Drive as well, but I don't always have a good signal when I'm at a client's place of business, so it's not as useful as having the files on my phone. Also, I can use my phone as an external drive on anyone's PC, so I can drag and drop files from their PC to phone and vice-versa. A lot of the Android issues that you bring up, are similar to issues that people bring up with Windows or Linux. Both of those OS's are able to run on a wide variety of hardware, as compared to OSX which can only run on a pre-defined set of hardware. It makes it a lot easier to make things 'just work' since the phone manufacturer is also the OS manufacturer. I was just talking to someone earlier who was complaining that they hate Google, because Google won't release a JellyBean update for their Samsung smartphone. Google release new versions of the OS and it is up to the manufacturer to make it work on their phone models, so Samsung is to blame, not Google. I've always found the iPhone to be useful for non-technical people who need a smartphone. I've been able to duplicate everything that my iPhone friends can do, with free apps from Google Play. It's all about what you need I guess. I like building Debian from source because it works well on my PC. My friend likes using his overpriced Mac with OSX because it dumbs things down for him. My parents like using Windows on their PC, because its fairly generic and easy to use.

=============================================================== From: Randy Yates ------------------------------------------------------ For years I ran Linux. For many years it was exclusively Linux on my PC. However, recently I've reluctantly went to Windows 7 because the Linux desktop environments today are just not stable enough for me. I'm a pretty technical person, and while I love to do technical things on my PC, my phone is something I want to work without any "fiddling". Android can run on a variety of hardware. This is a positive and negative feature to me. I don't like that iOS only runs on the iPhone and that I'm stuck with the iPhone if I want iOS and vice versa. However, iOS/iPhone is a great combination for usability. I've owned Macs in the past (I don't currently own one), and I like OS X. Currently, Windows 7 is my favorite OS. It's stable and I can do anything I want with it. I prefer to run dev environments in Linux VMs, but other than that, it's great. I guess after over 20 years of fiddling with computers, I just don't have the energy to fiddle with phones. I want things that work well without any customizations. I think a major element to consider when reading my points above, that I failed to mention, is that I don't use my mobile to replace my desktop. I use the phone. I play games on it when I'm bored. I browse the Internet when I need some information quickly. I check my email with it. I use an instant messenger and send/receive text messages. I use the calculator. I take pictures and videos of my kids with it. However, I just don't use my phone as a PC and I hate the thought of having to. I don't like the input capabilities of mobile devices compared to full PCs and I'm one of the few people who thinks that mobiles are not going to replace PCs. They are just a separate market. I may just be getting old.

=============================================================== From: Randy Yates ------------------------------------------------------ I would also like to add that the reason I started that long list of counterpoints was because I went to the link and read the first one about the battery, and I felt that I had to say something about that. I had issue after issue with the battery on my HTC. Sure it was great that I could take it out, but it was bad that it was a necessity. I actually had two of the same phones. The first one started having trouble with the screen. The entire right quarter of the display went bad. The second/final one that I owned would not come back on or charge after it went completely dead. I had to trick it into taking a charge for some reason. I would take the battery out of my wife's HTC, put my battery in her phone. I could then get it to start charging. After a few minutes I would take the battery back out and put it in my phone. It would then start charging. That's some fiddling that I prefer not to have to do when my phone discharges completely. The HTCs battery life started out at around 8 hours of idling time. After a couple of months it was down to around 4 hours. That was if I wasn't using it much. When I bought my latest iPhone, I charged it on a Monday and used it till Thursday without charging it. And like anyone with a new toy, I was using it quite a bit. I was flat out amazed at the battery life. So, while being able to remove the battery is a plus. I don't need to remove it with the iPhone. Whereas it was a requirement for my HTC. That's why I started my long list. I was that passionate about the first point I had to continue. Hehe.

=============================================================== From: Luke Prince ------------------------------------------------------ My suggestion for anyone wanting to try Android at its best is to stick with the "Nexus" devices, such as the Nexus 7 or Nexus 10 tablets (I have heard through friends they rock) and the Nexus 4 phone (I own one personally and love it). My previous experience was using an OG Motorola Droid, an LG Optimus, and a Motorola RAZR prior to buying this Nexus 4 about a month ago and the difference between the phones is crazy. The N4 has really blown the others out of the water for me with its battery life and speed and runs vanilla Android which has been a much better experience than the Moto/LG skins that my other phones came with. The Nexus line of Android products is the "flagship" that Google pushes and so far they have all got rave reviews since their release. Google advocates using them as a development target and doesn't shoot for the latest and fastest hardware like Sammy or HTC do. Another strong point in the Nexus favor is that Google sends out timely updates for Android to them (for the most part, some of the early Nexii not so much anymore). Lastly, the devices are all reasonably priced IMO... check out the play store and see what you think. ----- Original Message -----

=============================================================== From: Carey A ------------------------------------------------------ The orginal message was about Android vs IOS, and it sounds like you had issues with HTC and not necessarily Android. Google doesn't make HTC phones, they make the OS that runs on those phones. It's like blaming your custom shift knob because your car won't start. I'm not out to bash anyone else's preferences. I have a G5 quad that I love using. Great hardware. I'm not a big fan of the OS because it doesn't do the things I need it to do.

=============================================================== From: Carey A ------------------------------------------------------ I agree with Luke. I have Nexus 7. The Nexus line runs raw Android, without all the extras that Samsung and HTC add (which affect battery life)

=============================================================== From: Randy Yates ------------------------------------------------------ In my original post I stated that some of my issues may be attributed to HTC, and it should be clear from my comments that I am completely aware that Android is the OS and HTC is the hardware and that Google doesn't make HTC phones. The original ZDNet article is geared more toward a new android phone vs the iPhone. I mean many of the features listed in the article are hardware related, not OS related. So I think I can safely argue with the points of the article on both the hardware and software side of things, because the article itself is mixed. I've never tried a Nexus, so I can't argue against them. I'm simply comparing my experience with Android (on one phone and two tablets) vs my two iPhones, and I can say that I get mad at my iPhone much less than I did any of the Android devices I've owned.

=============================================================== From: Stephen Kraus ------------------------------------------------------ I like the cut of your gib Randy

=============================================================== From: Dave Brockman ------------------------------------------------------ -----BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE----- Hash: SHA1 Help me tell all these damn kids with their phone-computers to Get off my lawn! :) I'm with you 100%. Why in the hell anyone would want to stare at a 2"x3" screen or even the 3"x7" or whatever this S4 thing is longer than a voicemail, I'll never understand. And I don't care what OS you run on your phone, interfacing with anything productive other than talking on it, just effing sucks hairy goat nads, and that includes texting, which is another abomination all in itself. Methinks there's too much blood in my alcohol level, it's about time to fix that :) Regards, dtb -----BEGIN PGP SIGNATURE----- Version: GnuPG v2.0.17 (MingW32) Comment: Using GnuPG with Thunderbird - http://www.enigmail.net/ iQEcBAEBAgAGBQJR4IfSAAoJEMP+wtEOVbcdm4QIAJJ/pMr/wkkocoaaT0fd9lQj eqUSppKzuXr5M67b4mYOgd3e3Q8DjxDwQRPE06ZkRzJjEk7kAx9bH30bEeC4oXbo 8lcnXre+DSo2lkGXj/7uTfvEsslr3vJAj/SLztQ2WPMvGkLXifnrFS/KGDVyshaA 0NrWwT+ITwMLJTRj/tA0M5HEt0O5l4N4RMswN/tWpFmt3ThPLTxTmt5XhYg7CSne LSjHbD2NeAz8lTIE4MNASHHFkm1pzrQ5M0Sm2/ZUowqYu/zsT1w1FPnEya2QXw0n ufSFYRUXB/TGEw4WvooEuaj31702szrvRpe/ashl+HHmz5h45L58Cd5neO0q3hM= =OWJB -----END PGP SIGNATURE-----

=============================================================== From: Stephen Haywood ------------------------------------------------------ A couple of you mentioned Motorola Droid and it reminded me of this article I read the other day. http://www.beneaththewaves.net/Projects/Motorola

=============================================================== From: Carey A ------------------------------------------------------ Some of us have to get up and walk around during the day. We can't all sit at a desk in an air-conditioned room ;) I can't always carry a laptop with me, but I can put my phone in my pocket and do most of the things that I do on my PC. It's not always easy, but it's easier than standing in a field, a half mile away from my car, with a laptop in one hand, trying to use it with the other.

=============================================================== From: Dave Brockman ------------------------------------------------------ -----BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE----- Hash: SHA1 Me neither... I do not however, have a need to for any computing resources in any fields a half mile away from a vehicle :) I'm pretty sure Netbook (keyboard is not an optional component) comes to my mind before phone does. YMMV, of course. Regards, dtb -----BEGIN PGP SIGNATURE----- Version: GnuPG v2.0.17 (MingW32) Comment: Using GnuPG with Thunderbird - http://www.enigmail.net/ iQEcBAEBAgAGBQJR4IwNAAoJEMP+wtEOVbcdjrIIAJ9D7aH5g2+VcPbJUcFZQeju pusI+cYXF2tisURB9wcfblCZ8EtsNJ3z0iEkS5iaTCHmMIVm2ij/p4h6AHcLjJy/ LCKxuj7MuVnWne+ds9afImij28dqv+rP52OXDSfiZXEn3vuZemdss8G46bUCqSsn pEVMMBjC4SdL+J9iHUp1HCkgCBpYtN+lnU6uGp/UV/CCQBm3EILJidO0m0jK5gpJ cV2Q9LFqU9bTTlJxybKqFzjvwoKK8f5JPSa28DKWPIfkRMRgZs1ICb55fX3LVnHb gFPspNmGCZ9SHykriEL3PLXPd9hlw7lZOTeXIGPl8KUKijD5pQCSBKPEe78gHXA= =+O71 -----END PGP SIGNATURE-----

=============================================================== From: Carey A ------------------------------------------------------ I have considered a netbook, but there's no WiFi out there and my phone still gets a good 3g signal. But, like using a laptop, you still end up trying to balance a netbook in one hand and use it with the other. I guess my thumbs have just adapted better than others - my hands are not small, but I have no problems with using an onscreen keyboard or navigating thru the UI.