Little VM Server

From: JonathanCalloway 
------------------------------------------------------
All, 


I'm toying with the idea of buying a heavy duty PC or server as cheaply as possible, and using a hypervisor to run about 2-3 VM's on it. I've looked at ESXi, but can't really find a management tool that doesn't cost money. Of course, KVM or any other *nix based solutions are viable here. However, I want something that's easy to set up, and flexible, so I can constantly remove images and add new ones whenever I want to play with a new OS. 


Any recommendations ? Also, any hardware recommendations? 


Thanks! 


 




=============================================================== From: Lynn Dixon ------------------------------------------------------ You really need to check out oVirt: http://www.ovirt.org/Home Its the upstream for Red Hat's RHEV product and its pretty awesome. It has a really nice web console to manage your environment, and you can run the console and hosts all one one machine. Plus, it uses KVM as the hypervisor.

=============================================================== From: Jason Brown ------------------------------------------------------ Hardware: Multi cores, lots of RAM. I like AMD for this kind of thing due to price per core being lower. Software: For a small cluster of host machines (or a single like you are talking about) I love this setup and use it in production: Ubuntu Jeos(minimal) host: https://help.ubuntu.com/12.04/serverguide/jeos-and-vmbuilder.html (Ignore all the extra stuff, it's just a minimal install). Oracle VirtualBox https://www.virtualbox.org/ PHP Virtualbox for remote management: https://code.google.com/p/phpvirtualbox/ I do worry that the project is nearly dead. --Jason Brown

=============================================================== From: Aaron Welch ------------------------------------------------------ I have LOTS of that hardware available cheap. Drop by the swap meet tomorro= w. -AW On Apr 12, 2013, at 8:36 AM, JonathanCalloway w= rote: possible, and using a hypervisor to run about 2-3 VM's on it. I've looked a= t ESXi, but can't really find a management tool that doesn't cost money. Of= course, KVM or any other *nix based solutions are viable here. However, I w= ant something that's easy to set up, and flexible, so I can constantly remov= e images and add new ones whenever I want to play with a new OS.

=============================================================== From: Jason Brown ------------------------------------------------------ It's been a while since I looked at it, and it looks like it is still very very RedHat world specific, lots of calls for developers to make it run on Debian/Ubuntu etc. Even the guest extensions only seem to work on RedHat based guests. If I am reading that incorrectly let me know. It looks nice if it actually supports other operating systems. --Jason

=============================================================== From: Dave Brockman ------------------------------------------------------ -----BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE----- Hash: SHA1 ESXi is meant to run headless on a server, you will not sit in front of an ESXi console and interact with your guests. (You can do a lot of VM management from the ESX CLI, but accessing a Guest console isn't one of them) vi-client is Windows only but is a free download from any installed ESXi host (technically it links directly to VMware's servers, but accessing any ESXi host in a web browser will link you to management utilities). Regards, dtb -----BEGIN PGP SIGNATURE----- Version: GnuPG v2.0.17 (MingW32) Comment: Using GnuPG with Thunderbird - http://www.enigmail.net/ iQEcBAEBAgAGBQJRaApOAAoJEMP+wtEOVbcd/XoIAK6tg4GepWsXv+RPKY5ofCYt aEQj0ni4o/0bQdChhPnfKja545evbqnLN8l4/byYBi/An5Pf9vZx1JsnG6VGiu6b p2wCXIG5qTJJZ23FxrtbgbtQEWbBHtaQxIWksQY9gRQ34HZtlV6hv99NmXv8K++v 39PypMUUiFeriUfIuthm7e0oZ2SYEUFGDWFWZ9K/pnE6aOhfhflL0F5in559dtQy zjJp0/tNcyk/yroiFuukEKxXHNbGaR2fnoWr6ZU2qtawc1W4vqqLAIcJw7YyeRLh ePJ7cp2CANA4GRuySjpQQ/h8WRdQqqfqEQFTPKM4kd010pjACry/aWFS04Chzu8= =r4Em -----END PGP SIGNATURE-----

=============================================================== From: Lynn Dixon ------------------------------------------------------ Jason, I think you are thinking about the management console itself? But yeah, oVirt runs on RHEL variants such as CentOS and Fedora. You will need to run oVirt's hypervisor on the server you want to use as a host, but you can also run the management console on this same machine. But, once you have the environment running, you can run any OS as a guest that will run on KVM, which is pretty much anything. The hypervisor is KVM at the core, and the only "Red Hat-ish" stuff is geared around the management of the hypevisor. I have built several Windows variants in oVirt, and I always use the latest KVM guest tools I can find. I prefer Spice to be the console, and it works great in Windows guests. The entire management console was re-written in JBOSS. Red Hat originally bought the product from Kumranet which was highly windows centric. Of course, Red Hat re-worked it to perform on their gear, but any CentOS or Fedora OS will run the management console. They are however, asking for help getting the console to run on top of other *NIX variants. TLDR: If your guest OS will run on KVM hypervisors, it will run in oVirt. oVirt is simply a pretty web console to manage KVM hypervisors, storage and hosts.

=============================================================== From: Jason Brown ------------------------------------------------------ True, you are only stuck with RedHat/Fedora for the management console, which is bad enough on it's own (for a Debian guy like me) but without the guest agent your options are also limited. This is they guest agent I was talking about: http://www.ovirt.org/Category:Ovirt

=============================================================== From: "Alex Smith (K4RNT)" ------------------------------------------------------ When I used VMware ESXi 3.5 when I was living in Nashville, I really enjoyed it, using the VMware Infrastructure Client software was pretty nice, but Windows only from what I remember. The same client is used for the regular ESX server, and the features you have access to depends on the license you have. When you installed ESXi initially and first connect to the server with the management software, you get a trial of the full ESX software feature set until you enter a license key, which locks in your license version permanently. After you enter the license key you get from VMware for free when you download the ESXi ISO, it enables the free ESXi feature set permanently. If you also connect to a licensed ESX server, you can access the full ESX features of that box on that host. The client software doesn't cost anything, and a lot of people mistake the "trial period" they see for being a trial on the management software, not the hypervisor itself. Overall, for general management of VMs in a small office environment, I liked ESXi, but I also jerry-rigged VirtualBox and phpVirtualBox to learn how to use it.

=============================================================== From: Matt Keys ------------------------------------------------------ I prefer AMD hardware, Ubuntu server 12.04 LTS, select SSH server and Virtual Host on installation. After installation is completed; sudo apt-get install virt-manager -y then just "sudo virt-manager" at the cli. The default vm nat works ok, but I prefer to bridge physical NICs and assign the VMs to those bridge interfaces. Doing it that way your VMs act like they're on the physical lan and you can forward ports to them from your router/gateway. My /etc/network/interfaces : # The primary network interface auto eth0 iface eth0 inet manual # bridge eth0 auto br0 iface br0 inet static address netmask network broadcast gateway # dns-* options are implemented by the resolvconf package, if installed dns-nameservers 8.8.8.8 dns-search bridge